tr bgcolor="#02021e">
Header image  
Guitarist / Singer / Songwriter  
 
 

Mark Newman Press Clippings...


Click On Title for the Whole Story

FMQB March 16, 2011

Mar 16, 2011
MARK NEWMAN - FMQB TRIPLE A CONFERENCE

Stats... Stats... Stats... There in no collapse in sight for R.E.M., with Collapse Into Now pick- ing up Most Added honors with 15 stations committing this week. Ben Harper has a strong week with Give Till It’s Gone scoring 14 adds to land in the second slot. It’s a second week in a row for The Cars’ Move Like This, which takes the third slot with 13 new com- mitments.
Finally, Noah And The Whale and The Head And The Heart each put nine adds on the board to tie for the last position.

Going into next week take some time to check out “Until The Morning Comes” by Mark Newman and The Wood Brothers’ “Shoofly Pie,” as well as the new full length by Keren Ann, entitled 101. The full list of impacting records can always be found on the Available For Airplay page of the Triple A format room at FMQB.com.

Walls of Jericho Releases on Oct 26, 2010

New York, NY (October 19, 2010)—Triple Threat Americana Singer/Songwriter/Guitarist Mark Newman, the man-in-demand for a wide range of artists, will release his new CD, Walls of Jericho, on October 26, 2010 (Danal Music LLC). Filled with tasty guitar licks, honest vocals and the kind of profound compositional strength that’s universal in scope, Walls Of Jericho is the follow-up to his 2006’s Must Be A Pony.

Newman’s band includes drummer/percussionist Shawn Murray, bassist Keith Lentin and guitarist/vocalist Naomi Margolin.

The 12 tracks encompass 10 originals and two covers: Willy DeVille’s “Mixed Up Shook Up Girl” and a rarity from 1969 San Francisco, “White Bird” by It’s A Beautiful Day, done as a folksy duet with vocalist Naomi Margolin and featuring Newman on dobro. As lead guitarist for the late Willy Deville’s touring band, Newman grew close with the enigmatic legend, so much so that DeVille’s widow, Nina, presented him with DeVille’s beloved dobro. Newman uses it on both covers. Longtime DeVille percussionist Boris Kinberg also plays on the track.

The originals bespeak a reserved intensity, a simmering of emotion just beneath the surface. Musically, he goes from topical to tropical as the righteous anger of "Fire On The Water" gives way to the balmy island intro of the DeVille cover. Other highlights include the bluesy flair of “I Wanna Know” and closer “Under The Sun” with its creative use of added percussion that percolates perfectly to propel the narrative.

Many of these songs have the type of instant recognition factor usually reserved for beloved favorites. That’s especially the case with opener “Until The Morning Comes,” with a melody so haunting, you’d swear you heard it before.

Lyrically, Newman has truly hit his stride, be it bemoaning the Gulf disaster (“Fire On The Water”), transcending an Israeli epiphany he experienced (“Walls Of Jericho”), remembering his dying father (“Taking Pictures”) or reliving the flush of realization that comes upon finding the love of your life (“She’s The One”).

Mark Newman has put it all together on Walls Of Jericho.

Track Listing:
1.) Until The Morning Comes
2.) Don’t Get Me Wrong
3.) Taking Pictures
4.) Fire On The Water
5.) Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl
6.) Walls of Jericho
7.) Vacation
8.) She’s The One
9.) Medicine Marie
10.) I Wanna Know
11.) White Bird
12.) Under The Sun

Sea of Tranquility- Walls of Jericho

Nov 28, 2010
Sea of Tranquility review of Walls of Jericho

Newman; Mark: Walls Of Jericho


I have to say that Mark Newman is a new name on me, although considering that he has been the sideman to the likes of Willy DeVille, Sam Moore and Sam The Sham, there's no doubt that he comes with a certain amount of pedigree. Newman debuted as a solo singer songwriter in 2006 with his Must Be A Pony album and Walls Of Jericho is his second outing under his own steam.

After only one run through of Walls Of Jericho, it is immediately apparent that you are listening to a master craftsman, blending blues, rock 'n' roll, funk, folk and a big slap of Americana, to serve up a potent brew of songs that will keep aficionados of this style of music more than happy. More impressive is that it is all done in a way that could and should genuinely see Newman as a household name. All sort of influences spring to mind when you are looking for comparisons for the sound on Walls Of Jericho, which such luminaries as Jackson Browne, Van Morrison, Neil Young and Don Henley (at his less commercial) being pretty close to the mark, but there is definitely a bluesier edge than most of those names would suggest and the depth of sound provided by this album is both seductive and heart warming.

Picking out highlights is a genuinely tough assignment, as I've yet to find a song that doesn't either pull at my heart strings, make me want to jive through the house, or croon along at full pelt. The gentle strum-along of "Vacation" is a prime example of the considered, but utterly convincing fare on this album; the guitar sways into and out of earshot in a way that leaves you bewitched by its spell and totally engrossed, but still demands that you belt out the words. Next up "She's The One" slows everything down with a deliberate almost ethnic rhythm providing the base for a Knopfler-esque piece of guitar work that is simply beautiful and while that is only a brief description of two consecutive songs, I could gush on at length about any given song on this album.

Newman shows a real empathy with his guitar, as he seems to play it with love and care, wringing every last emotional note from it and his vocals are full and rich in a way that lands him somewhere between Jackson Browne and an American Paul Rogers. The three or four songs on the album where his voice is augmented by female duets or background with Naomi Margolin are simply stunning and also illustrates that Newman is willing to let his backing band which features Shawn Murray on drums and James Dower on organ (along with many others guests) are never left in the main man's shadow.

I can't stop playing and becoming lost in the joys of Walls Of Jericho and have to say that it is the best album of this type that I have heard for a considerable time.

Track Listing
1. Until The Morning Comes
2. Don't Get Me Wrong
3. Taking Pictures
4. Fire On The Water
5. Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl
6. Walls of Jericho
7. Vacation
8. She's The One
9. Medicine Marie
10. I Wanna Know
11. White Bird
12. Under The Sun
Added: November 28th 2010

We Will Rock You Review

Nov 17, 2010

Walls of Jericho is singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Mark Newman’s follow-up to his 2006 solo debut Must Be A Pony. It’s a strong slice of urban Americana that jumps around stylistically, while retaining enough of an artistic focus to make it a real album, instead of just a collection of songs.

From the opening track “Until The Morning Comes” it’s clear that one of Newman’s great strengths is in melody writing. The tune is infectious to the point where it could/should be a hit single in some alternate universe where indy artists have a real shot at radio.

The album is full of strong melodies and great performances. Every track on the record has something to like about it, from the chorus harmonies on “Don’t Get Me Wrong,” to the tasteful slide guitar solos peppered throughout the album.

Standout tracks include “Taking Pictures,” a sentimental lyric about birth, death and the circle of life; “Fire on the Water,” whose sprightly clap-along groove belies a caustic-yet-funny lyric aimed at the Gulf disaster and the folly of drilling in the Gulf; and the island groove of “Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl,” a cover of the Willy DeVille song featuring Newman playing DeVille’s own dobro. Mark Newman played in DeVille’s band, and after the singer’s untimely death in 2009 his wife gave Newman the instrument.

The title song “Walls of Jericho” features an unusual rhythm guitar/bass arrangement that underpins a pop/jazz melody, topped off by an organ solo and a guitar solo. It’s an ambitious arrangement and an ambitious lyric, and the fact that Newman pulls it off is much to his credit.

The production and instrumentation of the album are superb. There are plenty of great instrumental and vocal performances, but they exist to serve the songs, rather than call attention to the individual performances. The acoustic guitar is the basis for many of the bed tracks, and Newman gets a clean, very present acoustic sound that helps to define the record as a straightforward singer/songwriter effort.

This is songwriting in the tradition of the great stylists of the 1970s, bringing to mind a latter-day Jim Croce in spots. You could almost call it heartland rock, but instead of the devastated towns and mills and farms of Springsteen and Mellencamp, Newman’s heartland is the gritty urban sprawl of New York City. You can almost smell the smoke in the nightclub on some of these tracks.

Overall Walls of Jericho is well worth a listen for any fan of acoustic music, singer/songwriters, electric pop/rock . . . really, any listener who wants to get turned on to a great talent wouldn’t go wrong by checking this record out.

Sun Herald - Family Memories...

Biloxi, MS
Nov 5, 2010
SunHerald Review of Mark Newma's Walls of Jericho

Family memories, road songs and much more...

‘Walls of Jericho,’ Mark Newman (Danal Music LLC, HHHH)
This Oct. 26 CD presents singer/songwriter/guitarist Mark Newman, who was lead guitarist for the late Willy Deville’s touring band performing 12 tracks (10 originals, two covers) with his band drummer/percussionist Shawn Murray, bassist Keith Lentin and guitarist/vocalist Naomi Margolin. There are other musical friends on different tunes.

Highlights of this Americana-drenched album include the two covers (the mostly acoustic, harmony-filled “White Bird” and “Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl”), the snarky goodbye song, “Don’t Get Me Wrong,” the oil spill lament “Fire on the Water,” and Newman’s excellent guitar work throughout, especially that tasty slide.

Those who want singer/songwriter stuff with a soulful bite will enjoy this one.

The TMR Zoo - Mark Newman Returns

Nov 2, 2010
Mark Newman Returns With A Very Strong Walls of Jericho CD
MARK NEWMAN RELEASES WALLS OF JERICHO

Walls of Jericho takes Mark Newman into poppier territory than found on his 2006 Americana album, Must Be A Pony. Sure, the title track of that collection had its pop sensibilities, but leaning more towards Rusty Kershaw than David LaFlamme and It’s A Beautiful Day, covered here on track 11, a version of the underground hit “White Bird.”

Newman does a nice job on that classic tune that always annoyed me, rounding it out and making it listenable (whereas LaFlamme and even a violin-laden rendition by Sam Bush were drenched in their “authenticity” bringing the song to a maudlin level a bit too hard to take). Newman does dip back into his traditional bag with “She’s The One”, but it still has a modern, Triple A folk style that works well in the context of these Walls of Jericho.

His voice is also on here and throughout the disc, and the playing is as superb as we’ve come to expect from this journeyman. “Until The Morning Comes” opens the disc and is highly commercial and quite beautiful. It’s a perfect opening to a very strong dozen tunes that have both integrity and personality.

Seattle PI- Music Review

Nov 2, 2010
Seattle, WA
Oakland Press on Mark Newman Walls of Jericho
Music Review: Mark Newman - Walls Of Jericho

By RICHARD MARCUS
BLOGCRITICS.ORG
It's a long walk to the centre stage microphone from either the right or left side of the stage where a band's lead guitarist usually hangs out. Oh sure, it might not look like a great distance physically, but to make the trip from being a sideman to fronting a band involves much more than just taking a few steps in one direction or the other. Think of all those times you've been impressed by either a background singer or a lead guitarist in a group and then compare that with how many of them have ever gone on to have a really successful solo career. To be honest the only one who springs instantly to my mind is Ry Cooder. I can't begin to count the number of people who've made me think, "Wow I'd like to hear them do something solo," only to be disappointed by what they produce on their own.Naomi and Mark

There's a big difference between being a really good musician and being a front person for a band. He or she will be the focus of an audiences' attention no matter wher e they are standing or what they are doing while on stage. Even when the spotlight temporarily leaves them to focus on another's solo, it always seems like they are only lending the attention to the other and things only return to normal when the spotlight finds them again. Call it charisma, call it a certain je ne sais quois, call it whatever you like, but there just seem to certain people who are made to be in the spotlight and others who are destined to support them.

The first time I saw or heard Mark Newman was on a telecast of a concert given by the late Willy DeVille on his last European tour. Newman wasn't a regular member of DeVille's touring band and in fact had never played with them before. What impressed me the most about watching Newman was seeing how he didn't try to copy the work of the man he was replacing, but had the confidence in his own abilities to bring his own interpretations to the material. It's very difficult to parachute into a band and replace somebody who has played with them for years, but not only did Newman not look out of place, he brought a new flavour to familiar material while remaining true to DeVille's distinctive sound. DeVille must have been happy with him as well, because after his death his widow presented Newman with her husband's dobro.

Aside from playing with DeVille and others over the years, Newman has also been forging his own solo career and his first release, Must Be A Poney, came out in 2006. Not having heard the previous CD I was intrigued enough by what I had seen him do in the telecast to check out his brand new release, Walls Of Jericho, and see if he was as capable a front man as he is a sideman. As ten of the twelve tracks on the disc are his own material it should provide a good indication of his ability to live in the spotlight rather than just sharing it for a few seconds a song.

For anyone who has seen Newman play guitar it should come as no surprise that right from the first track, "Until The Morning Comes", his playing is what grabs your attention. Yet it's not because he's doing any of the typical guitar hero stuff involving playing a million notes at high speed or tearing a hole through the middle of a song with any of the other pyrotechnics that seem to be the stock in trade of lead guitarists. Instead what you'll notice about his playing is its clarity of tone and how he has integrated it into the overall flow of each song. His songs aren't simply excuses for him to unleash blistering guitar solos or to show off in any manner, they are fully crafted pieces of work made up of more than just his own talents on stringed instruments.

I say stringed instruments because Newman is not only a highly skilled guitar player, but also shines on pedal steel, mandolin, and bass and slide guitars. No matter which of these instruments he happens to pick up he plays it with the same clarity of tone and restraint that was so appealing on the opening track. Of course there's more to songs and an album than just someone's ability to play their instrument; there's a couple of things called lyrics and vocals which go a long way towards making or breaking a tune. To be honest, Newman's vocal abilities don't jump out and strike you immediately as there's nothing that marks his voice as instantly distinctive. On the other hand he's not one of those people who initially impress you with some specific vocal quirk but who lose your attention after a song or two when you discover they have nothing else to offer, including sincerity.

What you'll learn about Newman over the course of listening to the recording is that while there doesn't seem to be anything particularly remarkable about his voice, you can't ignore it. Like his guitar playing his vocals aren't about wowing you, but about being in service to the material. Whether he has a particular message he's trying to put across, like "Fire On The Water" and what it has to say about oil spills caused by the recklessness of oil companies, or is being a little more abstract as is the case with the haunting "White Bird", he doesn't have any trouble holding your attention. The only exception for me was the seventh track on the disc, "Vacation," and that was just a matter of personal taste as it wasn't the type of song I like. That's not to say it wasn't as well written and performed as the rest of the disc, it just wasn't my cup of tea.

Anyone who has heard Mark Newman play guitar, or any of the other instruments he is so highly proficient with, will be well aware of what a talented sideman he is. After listening to Walls Of Jericho you will see he's equally capable of taking the large step from the side of the stage to the centre. His abilities as a singer, songwriter and interpreter of other people's material, including a cover of his former band leader's, Willy DeVille, "Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl", are such that he can more than hold his own in the bright glare of the spotlight. Even better is how he uses the light in order to serve the material and not his ego, sharing it with others, like his duet with Naomi Margolin on "White Bird", so that the listener is able to get the most out of a song as possible. Mark Newman may not be a name everybody recognizes as a band leader right now, but after listening to this album you can't help but think that will change in the not too distant future.

View the original article on blogcritics.org

The Joe Vig Top 40 - Nos. 9 Walls Of Jericho

Nov 1, 2010

Also read review on TMR Zoo

1.) Until The Morning Comes
2.) Don’t Get Me Wrong
3.) Taking Pictures
4.) Fire On The Water
5.) Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl
6.) Walls of Jericho
7.) Vacation
8.) She’s The One
9.) Medicine Marie
10.) I Wanna Know
11.) White Bird
12.) Under The Sun

Walls of Jericho takes Mark Newman into poppier territory than found on his 2006 Americana album, Must Be A Pony. Sure, the title track of that collection had its pop sensibilities, but leaning more towards Rusty Kershaw than David LaFlamme and It's A Beautiful Day, covered here on track 11, a version of the underground hit "White Bird". Newman does a nice job on that classic tune that always annoyed me, rounding it out and making it listenable (whereas LaFlamme and even a violin-laden rendition by Sam Bush were drenched in their "authenticity" bringing the song to a maudlin level a bit too hard to take). Newman does dip back into his traditional bag with "She's The One", but it still has a modern, Triple A folk style that works well in the context of these Walls of Jericho. His voice is also on here and throughout the disc, and the playing is as superb as we've come to expect from this journeyman. "Until The Morning Comes" opens the disc and is highly commercial and quite beautiful. It's a perfect opening to a very strong dozen tunes that have both integrity and personality.

Here's a useful link to It's A Beautiful Day

69 Faces of Rock Review of Mark Newman

Nov 2010
69 Faces Rock
It's not often you come across a fairly new player with an incredibly sharp classic sound. That's certainly the case with Mark Newman. His new album just rocks. Newman's middle of the road rock style is one winning formula. There are a lot of comparisons that come to mind: Ry Cooder, The Allman Brothers Band, The Eagles, and even Lynyrd Skynyrd. And few other things in between, but what really strikes here is the mature songwriting. His structures and arrangements are very interesting. Newman is quite accomplished in that area, but he's a great guitar player as well.

"Walls of Jericho" instantly puts you in a great mood. It's a very positive album, catchy and memorable. There are plenty of great hooks that just tempt the listener's attention. Newman's delivery is very reflective and certainly radio friendly. And he can slide too. The album consists of two covers Willy DeVille's "Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl," and It's A Beautiful Day's signature "White Bird." Both done with great style and feel, and ideally fit with the rest of the material.

 While Newman is not breaking any new norms, what he does is quite fantastic. The album has a definite charm, and should certainly find a large audience.

MWE3.Com - Music Web Express 3000 - Review

Nov 2010

DANAL MUSIC - A great pop/rock CD with a wide breadth of memorable music and musicianship, Walls Of Jericho is a splendid introduction to the music of Mark Newman. Accurately described as a triple threat musician, Newman’s music and vocals are truly first rate while his guitar work is nothing to scoff at. In fact, fans of Duane Allman and Dicky Betts should give a listen to Newman’s electric guitar work which is highlighted here along with his performance on dobro, lap steel, mandolin and bass. A number of musicians assist Newman on Walls Of Jericho, including drummer Shawn Murray who really drives on the big beat. I was thinking as to who Newman reminded me vocally and I right away thought of the soulful rock vocals of Gregg Allman but also Newman’s cover of the ‘60s rock classic “White Bird” originally from It’s A Beautiful Day is a most fitting and rarely witnessed tribute to that underrated band’s great psychedelic rock singer David LaFlamme. Even with so many influences and music musical touchstones on hand, Newman’s own songs are really what carries his superbly recorded CD into the end zone. Time well spent for classic rock fans, Mark Newman’s Walls Of Jericho establishes him as a significant recording artist in his own right.

The Oakland Press - New & Noteworhty

Oct 30, 2010
Oakland Press on Mark Newman Walls of Jericho
New & Noteworthy

Mark Newman, “Walls of Jericho” (Danal Music): The singer-songwriter-guitarist’s sophomore album includes covers of It’s a Beautiful Day’s “White Bird” and Willy DeVille’s “Mixed Up Shook Up Girl.”

Leap in the Dark - Music Review

Oct 2010

Music Review: Mark Newman - Walls Of Jericho

It's a long walk to the centre stage microphone from either the right or left side of the stage where a band's lead guitarist usually hangs out. Oh sure it might not look like a great distance physically, but to make the trip from being a sideman to fronting a band involves much more than just taking a few steps in one direction or the other. Think of all those times you've been impressed by either a background singer or a lead guitarist in a group and then compare that with how many of them have ever gone on to have a really successful solo career. To be honest the only one who springs instantly to my mind is Ry Cooder. I can't begin to count the number of people who've made me think, "Wow I'd like to hear them do something solo", only to be disappointed by what they produce on their own.

There's a big difference between being a really good musician and being a front person for a band. He or she will be the focus of an audiences' attention no matter where they are standing or what they are doing while on stage. Even when the spotlight temporarily leaves them to focus on another's solo, it always seems like they are only lending the attention to the other and things only return to normal when the spotlight finds them again. Call it charisma, call it a certain je ne sais quois, call it whatever you like, but there just seem to certain people who are made to be in the spotlight and others who are destined to support them.

 The first time I saw or heard Mark Newman was on a telecast of a concert given by the late Willy DeVille on his last European tour. Newman wasn't a regular member of DeVille's touring band and in fact had never played with them before. What impressed me the most about watching Newman was seeing how he didn't try to copy the work of the man he was replacing, but had the confidence in his own abilities to bring his own interpretations to the material. It's very difficult to parachute into a band and replace somebody who has played with them for years, but not only did Newman not look out of place, he brought a new flavour to familiar material while remaining true to DeVille's distinctive sound. DeVille must have been happy with him as well, because after his death his widow presented Newman with her husband's dobro.

 Aside from playing with DeVille and others over the years, Newman has also been forging his own solo career and his first release, Must Be A Poney, came out in 2006. Not having heard the previous CD I was intrigued enough by what I had seen him do in the telecast to check out his brand new release, Walls Of Jericho, and see if he was as capable a front man as he is a sideman. As ten of the twelve tracks on the disc are his own material it should provide a good indication of his ability to live in the spotlight rather than just sharing it for a few seconds a song.

For anyone who has seen Newman play guitar it should come as no surprise that right from the first track, "Until The Morning Comes", his playing is what grabs your attention. Yet it's not because he's doing any of the typical guitar hero stuff involving playing a million notes at high speed or tearing a hole through the middle of a song with any of the other pyrotechnics that seem to be the stock in trade of lead guitarists. Instead what you'll notice about his playing is its clarity of tone and how he has integrated it into the overall flow of each song. His songs aren't simply excuses for him to unleash blistering guitar solos or to show off in any manner, they are fully crafted pieces of work made up of more than just his own talents on stringed instruments.

I say stringed instruments because Newman is not only a highly skilled guitar player, but also shines on pedal steel, mandolin, and bass and slide guitars. No matter which of these instruments he happens to pick up he plays it with the same clarity of tone and restraint that was so appealing on the opening track. Of course there's more to songs and an album than just someone's ability to play their instrument; there's a couple of things called lyrics and vocals which go a long way towards making or breaking a tune. To be honest, Newman's vocal abilities don't jump out and strike you immediately as there's nothing that marks his voice as instantly distinctive. On the other hand he's not one of those people who initially impress you with some specific vocal quirk but who lose your attention after a song or two when you discover they have nothing else to offer, including sincerity.

 What you'll learn about Newman over the course of listening to the recording is that while there doesn't seem to be anything particularly remarkable about his voice, you can't ignore it. Like his guitar playing his vocals aren't about wowing you, but about being in service to the material. Whether he has a particular message he's trying to put across, like "Fire On The Water" and what it has to say about oil spills caused by the recklessness of oil companies, or is being a little more abstract as is the case with the haunting "White Bird", he doesn't have any trouble holding your attention. The only exception for me was the 7th track on the disc, "Vacation" and that was just a matter of personal taste as it wasn't the type of song I like. That's not to say it wasn't as well written and performed as the rest of the disc, it just wasn't my cup of tea.

Anyone who has heard Mark Newman play guitar, or any of the other instruments he is so highly proficient with, will be well aware of what a talented sideman he is. After listening to Walls Of Jericho you will see he's equally capable of taking the large step from the side of the stage to the centre. His abilities as a singer, songwriter and interpreter of other people's material, including a cover of his former band leader's, Willy DeVille, "Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl", are such that he can more than hold his own in the bright glare of the spotlight. Even better is how he uses the light in order to serve the material and not his ego, sharing it with others, like his duet with Naomi Margolin on "White Bird", so that the listener is able to get the most out of a song as possible. Mark Newman may not be a name everybody recognizes as a band leader right now, but after listening to this album you can't help but think that will change in the not too distant future.







All rights reserved, 2011(c) Mark Newman

Walls of Jericho Released Oct 26 Buy it Now!